Posts Tagged ‘engineering’

So… is there a Director’s Cup for academics?

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

I mean, I could be more subtle, but where's the fun in that?

U.S. News and World Report recently released its graduate school rankings for 2013, and it’s a good year for Stanford.

The full list is here, but below I’ve included some highlights:
What makes me happiest about this list is that we’re scoring high across the board – in both science and humanities areas.  In the words of Borat, great success!  Go Cardinal!!

Stanford Proposes $2.5 Billion NYC Campus

Wednesday, October 26th, 2011

A model of Stanford's proposed NYC campus on Roosevelt Island.

With Big Apple-sized ambition, Stanford submitted today its proposal to build a $2.5 billion, 1.9-million-square-foot tech campus called StanfordNYC, responding to Mayor Bloomberg’s request for proposals to turn New York City into the world’s next great high-tech hub. Stanford is proposing a “world-class applied science and engineering campus” on Roosevelt Island, with an emphasis on turning research in engineering, technology, and entrepreneurship into viable businesses. The campus would be at the graduate level only.

So how would all of this come to pass? Here’s how Stanford breaks it down in its 600-page proposal:

If all of this did happen according to plan, Stanford expects some wild results, including the creation of 7,000 construction jobs for New York and over a 100,000 new jobs created within the first 20 to 30 years of the campus. Stanford’s chief competitor is Cornell, which has also submitted a proposal for a Roosevelt Island campus. The deadline for submissions is October 28, and while Stanford expects to hear an answer from the city by the end of the year, the mayor’s office has stated that a decision will likely come in 2012.

This proposal is unquestionably bold, and the job numbers are preliminary at best. But is it quixotic? Stanford’s administration certainly does not think so, and it is ramping up the heat against Cornell to compete for the city’s attention. Cornell cited its already-strong connection to New York through its medical campus as one its big cards, whereas President Hennessy, a native New Yorker, told the New York Times, “We know how to get young people involved in start-ups. Cornell’s disadvantage is all its start-ups put together are smaller than Google.”

Stanford is already a global research institution, and as a student studying abroad in Madrid, I can confirm that its brand has already reached some very far corners of the world. How much more of a presence do we need? StanfordNYC is an intriguing concept, but I would like to see and hear more from Stanford’s administration about why it would be the best use of a major chunk of Stanford’s resources in the upcoming decades. The proposed campus may be far, but the money and manpower will hit pretty close to home.

Why the Quarter System?

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011

So, like many other students here, my Facebook wall is plaguing me with statuses from friends suffering through finals and anticipating summer. In a week. My own mother called me last week and asked if I was taking my finals soon – the joke was not appreciated. The majority of universities across the country have the semester system. I can’t help but wonder why, in this one case, Stanford is different.

The general spiel I get can be found on Stanford’s website:

Stanford’s unique quarter-system calendar allows students to take advantage of dozens of additional courses not possible under a more traditional semester calendar.

But after thinking about it for 2 seconds, there are more disadvantages than advantages. Just today, a professor of mine was upset because he couldn’t cover all the material he had planned because of the limited amount of weeks we have. Both students and professors alike are being rushed through material that should be explored for longer amounts of time. Or worse, professors believe that the difference between 10 and 15 weeks is infinitesimal and hand out assignments as if it really were a semester system. I have no doubt that this mentality is part of the reason why the Duck Syndrome exists.

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