Posts Tagged ‘social media’

Be Thoughtful About KONY 2012

Saturday, March 10th, 2012

Joseph Kony, an African warlord leading the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), has become an international sensation thanks to Invisible Children, a group of human rights activists. They been able to successfully wield social media to make people care about their cause. Kony is now famous because the world wants his arrest and prosecution for his “crimes against humanity.”

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YouTube DirektKony 2012

I watched the KONY 2012 video. I clapped at moments of triumph for people in Uganda and didn’t allow myself to hide my eyes at the images of mutilation or abduction. Even though I’m the last person to follow major trends, considering the gravity of the idea and the sheer number of people attempting to share it through Twitter and Facebook, I understood ┬áthat it is something that I shouldn’t ignore.

After finally seeing the video for myself I learned a few things:

  1. Everything about the video was created to appeal to the youth of developed nations. There were cute kids, horror, and a mission deeply seated in social media and activism. Anyone watching that video can help by sharing it.
  2. This is a 9 year old problem, with circumstances that may or may have changed since the video was produced.
  3. There was both the Mumford & Sons and dubstep in the same video. And it worked. Both reflect the way the filmmaker appealed to the culture Gen Y knows and loves. It made it seem like the video wasn’t coming from a major stuffy organization, or a ragtag group of freedom fighters – it came from one of us. Or, at least, it was meant to feel that way. (more…)

How Social Media Has Revolutionized the Drunken Sports Victory Riot

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

There’s rioting in the streets of San Francisco. And no, it’s not excitement about election day.

You can see exactly where people are going nuts.

Earlier tonight, the San Francisco Giants defeated the Texas Rangers to win the World Series (that’s baseball, if you were confused). Afterwards, your typical intoxicated excited sports fans began celebrating in slightly socially unacceptable ways. Nothing too earth-shattering there, especially when you compare it to soccer hooligans.

The craziness in San Francisco, though, has a new social-media component that adds a completely different dimension to raucous behavior: instant self-journalism. You can see photos of what is happening around the city as it occurs, listen to police radio streams, and you can track wherever the crazed action is based on twitter reports. Even better, you can “check into” a riot on Foursquare, a social connections app.

Leave it to San Francisco to incorporate social media into literally everything in the world.